Phoenix for Greek was Vena in Vedic culture.

FengShui legend: Indian Emperor Asoka, the Great asking for the powerful, mysterious and sacred Phoenix from a contemporary Chinese King before embarking on Kalinga war (265 BC or 263 BC). The Chinese (Jin Dynasty) obliged with a replica of Phoenix and the Indian King went on to win the war.

It is lonely at the top.
Truly successful people are always lonely.
And I see an amazing connection between the Phoenix and the great success.
The Phoenix is a unique bird, there may only exist one at a time, which makes it a solitary bird.
It does not reproduce, which adds to its loneliness, as only its death will bring on another of its race.
Phoenix has always been considered the symbol for resurrection, of rising again, of rising from the ashes…
Phoenix is not only a Greek legend. Every country has a similar myth.
The Egyptians describe the Phoenix as the Benu.
In the Hindu legend of Phoenix, the same bird is called Vena in the Rig Veda.
The legend is originally believed to be Vedic. India and to be exact, Indonesia, is considered the true land of the Phoenix by a school of thought. The Greek and the Roman myths were believed to have been copied from the Egypt which had picked up from India!
Jewish too have a legend about the immortal bird. It is Milcham for the Jews.
Talking of the immortality of the Phoenix, the most interesting episode is its regeneration.
When it feels its end approaching (between 500 and 1461 years, depending on the legend), it builds a nest with the finest aromatic woods, sets it on fire, and is consumed by his own flames. From the pile of ashes, a new Phoenix arises, young and powerful. It then embalms the ashes of its predecessor in an egg of myrrh, and flies to the city of the Sun, Heliopolis, where he deposits the egg on the altar of the Sun god.
I have a different, very unusual version of the Phoenix, the Chinese.
This is the first Phoenix painted on the first generation silk and was discovered from a tomb near Changsha and the archeological studies trace it to be over 2500 years old.
phoenix[1] (Ancient)

Exclusive to the King, this Phoenix was considered a sacred and mysterious symbol that always led the emperor to victory. The common Chinese was strictly prohibited from using this pattern and especially on a yellow robe. Yellow, on any fabric, was reserved only for the royals.
There is a story about Indian Emperor Asoka, the Great asking for the powerful, mysterious and sacred Phoenix from a contemporary Chinese King before embarking on Kalinga war (265 BC or 263 BC). The Chinese (Jin Dynasty) obliged with a replica of Phoenix and the Indian King went on to win the war.
It is ironic that, this same King, because of remorse over the killings of thousands of people, embraced Buddhism and later propagated it in his empire.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Author: admin

Mohan Deep is a novelist and star biographer.